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Abigail Echo-Hawk on Decolonizing Data

Jan 16, 2020
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Abigail Echo-Hawk will be speaking about her work on decolonizing data.

Abigail Echo-Hawk is the chief research officer of the Seattle Indian Health Board. She works to create programs and databases that are not based on Western concepts to better serve indigenous communities. (full bio below)

This event is part of the Feminist and Accessible Publishing and Communications Technologies Speaker and Workshop Series (https://www.feministandaccessiblepublishingandtechnology.com). This series was made possible thanks to the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, the Institute for Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies of McGill, MILA, the Dean of Arts Development Fund of McGill, Media @McGill, McGill’s Department of History and Classical Studies, the William Dawson Fund, RéQEF, the Moving Image Research Laboratory, Element AI, and L’Euguélionne: Montreal’s Feminist Bookstore.

There is no fee required to attend this event. Notes on accessibility will be announced closer to the event.

Abigail Echo-Hawk, MA (Pawnee), she was born in the heart of Alaska where she was raised in the traditional values of giving, respect for all and love. Ms. Echo-Hawk currently serves as the Director of the Urban Indian Health Institute, and the Chief Research Officer at the Seattle Indian Health Board. Urban Indian Health Institute is a Tribal Epidemiology Center that serves tribal people currently living off tribal lands nationwide. In addition, in UIHI’s role as the National Coordinating Center for Good Health and Wellness in Indian Country, she also works with approximately 100 tribal nations. Her work incorporates these core principles and activities: engagement and participation of community partners; research and evaluation on health, healthcare, and other community priorities; education, training, and capacity-building for Native people, including researchers, students, and communities; infrastructure development; technical assistance; and sharing results in a way that recognizes and respects the unique cultural contexts of American Indian and Alaska Native people. In these roles she also works with American Indian and Alaska Native tribes and organizations to identify health research priorities and with health researchers to ensure research is done in a manner that respects tribal sovereignty and is culturally appropriate.